Category Archives: Food

Turn culled pigeons into pigeon pie, says councillor – Telegraph

In Royston, pigeons are to be managed by culling (no mention of culling methods). Other management methods discussed–killer hawks, avian contraceptives and disuading pigeons from roosting with fire gel (a new optical product that repels pest birds by creating the optical illusion of fire).

fire gel  source

According to leader of the council, Bob Smith, “The problem with fire gel is that it would only repel them from wherever we put the gel and we can’t smother the entire town in gel.”

 Turn culled pigeons into pigeon pie, says councillor – Telegraph

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photocentricity

Have been wondering about most photographed birds, thinking the pigeon has to be right up there. Indeed it is! 5th in line as far as my limited research tells me.

According to flickr 9.14.11 search results, ducks are first by a long shot (2,075,972,) followed by eagles (1,511,931) and then swans (925,360.) Robins next (875,159,) That’s four. Pigeons 5th (549,506.) Interestingly, food images show up on the first page of duck photos whereas pigeon doesn’t show up as food until pigeon photo pg. 13.

Pigeon Point Lighthouse images appear by pg. 5. There end up being a fair amount of them. Later and much fewer–photos of Pigeon Falls, Pigeon Cove, Pigeon Park, Pigeon Lake, The Pigeon Detectives, Pigeon John, Pigeon Toe Ceramics, pigeon pose….

If you do a google image search for the same birds (ducks, eagles, swans, robins and pigeons) the numbers get totally unwieldy but maintain their relative order.  Except robins end up on top due to a confusion with Robin Williams and Batman.

Fitting nicely with the ordering theme of this post, found this photo of MissCharity’s on flickr pigeon pg. 40.

PIGEON HIGH RISE

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Getting to the meat: The Pigeon Relocation and Management Project

We’re accepting applications  for participation in the PIGEON RELOCATION AND MANAGEMENT PROJECT funded by an Ohio State University Faculty Research Enhancement Grant.  Using the only effective, safe and humane  deterrent system recommended by the Pigeon Control Advisory Service, selected pigeons will be discouraged from roosting in unwanted areas.

Pigeons nesting where you don’t want them?  Are you a Coshocton, Ohio resident? Fill out our form to enter your pigeons.  Pigeon Relocation Application Form

After 71 years of use as a public building, first as the Coshocton YWCA, then as the Maria Hay Forbes Center, the J. P. Forbes House was demolished in early 2011.

In the fall of 2008 there were 364 pigeons that alternately sat on the roof of the Maria Hay Forbes Center and the electric lines passing over the radio station. (High school students counted them as part of a collaborative project with the Pomerene Center for the Arts. view video)  Since the demolition of the Maria Hay Forbes Center and its pigeon friendly tower and ample eave returns, where have all those pigeons gone?

We’re interested in learning where the pigeons have relocated. In turn, we are proposing to relocate 10 pairs from these current environments (where they are presumably unwanted) to the old PARK hotel spacewhere they can be managed. We think in terms of deviating from the Elmer Fudd/Bugs Bunny prototype of human/ animal relationships and ask…Doesn’t Elmer always lose? Aren’t we always on the side of the cwazy wabbit? Can we re-imagine how we fit into our environment?

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Can’t Eliminate an Invasive Species? Try Eating It. – NYTimes.com

Can’t Eliminate an Invasive Species? Try Eating It. – NYTimes.com.

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Pigeon Milk, the wonder food

10 day old squab on a building ledge in New York City - image by Cutiepie Company

Lucky chubby squab. Fed the wonder food of Pigeon milk, they can double their size in 48 hours. In the book Pigeon, Barbara Allen also reports that, “Pigeon milk fuels what is one of the most explosive growth rates of almost any creature on earth”.  I’d like my next protein shake to be made of pigeon milk.

How to milk them? Fortunately, both the parent pigeons secrete the milk from their crops, which is located where the breast is. No nipples though, they use their throats like straws in reverse and their beaks serve as the delivery point into the mouths of their squab. So, I’m imagining a mechanical squab head bobbing around in the nest which is designed to accept the milk from the parent. This does sound ridiculous at first, but robotic cow milking machines are doing the same thing: mechanically milking an animal so humans can enjoy the nutritious results. Do check out this video of a robot milker in action on YouTube.  Pigeon milk might take longer to get, but it has more protein and fat than cow or human milk, so perhaps it would be worthwhile? [I can’t help but think of that recent, viral story about breast milk ice cream]. Thinking through the oddities of milking animals is enough to cause me to ask for almond milk in my next protein shake.

Breast milk ice cream on sale at a London ice cream parlour. Photograph: Graham Turner for the Guardian

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a short history of my interest in pigeons.1


Yoshio Komatsu, Earthen Pigeon Houses, pg. 319, BUILT BY HAND Vernacular Buildings Around the World, by Athena Steen, Bill Steen and Eiko Komatsu, Gibb Smith Publisher, Salt Lake City © 2003

I trace my interest in pigeons to a seemingly inessential discovery of and visual seduction by this photo of clay pigeon towers–I am in love with these raw towers randomly punctuated with holes and sticks like wild hair for perches.

Stage two.  Cursory reading.  I am led to an admiration of the simplicity of the agriculture–of the ancient consensual relationship between humans and pigeons: pilfered grain and seeds in exchange for squab, housing in exchange for guano (fertilizer in the middle east, for growing voluptuous Persian melons.)

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Squab: from Power Line to Plate

High school students in Coshocton, Ohio, considered the possibility of pigeon squab as a food source. They interviewed the community as well as a health department official.

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Filed under Cooking, Food, Harvesting, Public Perception