Category Archives: Public Perception

Pigeons must be mourning

Pigeons must be mourning the death of Oscar Niemeyer, their greatest modern architect. He made a very stylish house for them in Brazil. New York Times reports his death today. He was 104.

 The dovecote designed in 1961 by Oscar Niemeyer on the Praça dos Três Poderes in Brasília, Brazil. Material: concrete.

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Spray painting machine for pigeons

Spray painting machine adds color to grey feral pigeons. Pests become partners in city beautification? http://ow.ly/ehT3S  Great questions raised by this artwork by Julien Charriere and Julius von Bismark.

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photocentricity

Have been wondering about most photographed birds, thinking the pigeon has to be right up there. Indeed it is! 5th in line as far as my limited research tells me.

According to flickr 9.14.11 search results, ducks are first by a long shot (2,075,972,) followed by eagles (1,511,931) and then swans (925,360.) Robins next (875,159,) That’s four. Pigeons 5th (549,506.) Interestingly, food images show up on the first page of duck photos whereas pigeon doesn’t show up as food until pigeon photo pg. 13.

Pigeon Point Lighthouse images appear by pg. 5. There end up being a fair amount of them. Later and much fewer–photos of Pigeon Falls, Pigeon Cove, Pigeon Park, Pigeon Lake, The Pigeon Detectives, Pigeon John, Pigeon Toe Ceramics, pigeon pose….

If you do a google image search for the same birds (ducks, eagles, swans, robins and pigeons) the numbers get totally unwieldy but maintain their relative order.  Except robins end up on top due to a confusion with Robin Williams and Batman.

Fitting nicely with the ordering theme of this post, found this photo of MissCharity’s on flickr pigeon pg. 40.

PIGEON HIGH RISE

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Enjoying the Interactive Wildlife

People might talk about pigeons as pests, but a recent visit to Venice, Italy revealed that this prevalent urban wildlife provides a constant stream of entertainment for kids, families, lovers, tourists and photographers. Everyone interacting with the pigeons out on the public squares was smiling and laughing. They walked around with outstretched, food-filled palms, calling for the pigeons to land on them. Pigeons appeared to enjoy the interaction too, devouring breadcrumbs and popcorn treats as they perched on the arms heads and shoulders of squealing people.

Playing with pigeons at Piazza San Marco in Venice, Italy

Couple having their photo taken with pigeons

Even with all of the beautiful architecture to photograph in the public squares of Venice, there were more cameras pointed at pigeons and people.

Cameras, pigeons and people

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Getting to the meat: The Pigeon Relocation and Management Project

We’re accepting applications  for participation in the PIGEON RELOCATION AND MANAGEMENT PROJECT funded by an Ohio State University Faculty Research Enhancement Grant.  Using the only effective, safe and humane  deterrent system recommended by the Pigeon Control Advisory Service, selected pigeons will be discouraged from roosting in unwanted areas.

Pigeons nesting where you don’t want them?  Are you a Coshocton, Ohio resident? Fill out our form to enter your pigeons.  Pigeon Relocation Application Form

After 71 years of use as a public building, first as the Coshocton YWCA, then as the Maria Hay Forbes Center, the J. P. Forbes House was demolished in early 2011.

In the fall of 2008 there were 364 pigeons that alternately sat on the roof of the Maria Hay Forbes Center and the electric lines passing over the radio station. (High school students counted them as part of a collaborative project with the Pomerene Center for the Arts. view video)  Since the demolition of the Maria Hay Forbes Center and its pigeon friendly tower and ample eave returns, where have all those pigeons gone?

We’re interested in learning where the pigeons have relocated. In turn, we are proposing to relocate 10 pairs from these current environments (where they are presumably unwanted) to the old PARK hotel spacewhere they can be managed. We think in terms of deviating from the Elmer Fudd/Bugs Bunny prototype of human/ animal relationships and ask…Doesn’t Elmer always lose? Aren’t we always on the side of the cwazy wabbit? Can we re-imagine how we fit into our environment?

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Filed under Food, History, Public Perception

The effects of pigeon cooing on the human mind

Crop milk production in pigeons is stimulated by the hormone prolactin. (This is the same hormone that stimulates milk production in mammals.) Interestingly, prolactin  produces an overall calming effect. Which fact leads neatly to a discussion of ‘calming’ and the effects of pigeon cooing on the human mind.

Predicated on the hypothesis that the human mind is pleasantly relaxed by the sound of pigeon cooing, we imagine the following experiment.

A range of volunteers, outfitted with electro-caps, is subjected to alternate recordings of circus music and pigeons cooing in the park.  Brain activity is recorded. The simplicity of the data imaging is humble, especially when juxtaposed against the spectacular imaging techniques driving today’s science. However simple, we find it illustrates the point.

To deepen our understandings, we ask you take the time to complete the brief survey below.

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Can’t Eliminate an Invasive Species? Try Eating It. – NYTimes.com

Can’t Eliminate an Invasive Species? Try Eating It. – NYTimes.com.

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